Hi Community, before we start with DHCP let us complette the DNS config by creating a Reverse Lookup Zone on our current DNS server. The first thing we have to do is to open the “Server Manager” and than click “DNS” under “Tools”. In the DNS MMC we click right on “Revers Loopup Zone” and select “New Zone…”. To learn more about DNS, feel free to visite Wiki page 5. To prevent us from to much network traffic because of DNS replication, we do not replicate the zone over the complette forest, we replicate only in this domain. After this you have to select the IP Version that will be handled by this zone. “Allow both nonsecure and secure dynamic updates” could be a entrace for Haks (DNS spoofing). Now you get a short summary and you can create the zone by clicking “Finish”. If all works fine you should see the new zone in you DNS MMC. So please select also “Store the zone in Active Directory”. In a pure Windows Server DNS environment you should select “Allow only secure dynamic updates” otherwise you should select “Do not allow dynamic updates”.

Windows 2016 dns reverse lookup zone not updating Isexychat mobile

Reverse lookup zone is mostly created and configured if the network is very large, and/or for testing purposes.

When the reverse lookup zone is created, you can also create the corresponding PTR records for the host records that are present in the forward lookup zone, which would help you to test the communication with the target host computers.

When the reverse lookup zone is created and configured, the NSLOOKUP command does not function properly, and also it sometimes displays incorrect results.

In order to use the NSLOOKUP command, and to rely on its results, you must remove the reverse lookup zone.

Update [27/06/2013]: new information regarding the topic: Windows 7 & Reverse Lookup DNS Registration [Update] In my current project we have an Active Directory domain where we use Windows DNS servers with domain integrated DNS zones.

For the reverse lookup zones we configured secure only updates.

As the DHCP servers in this environment are Linux based we would like the clients to update their PTR records themselves.

Updating the PTR records means a client registers his name and IP in the reverse lookup zone.

As we noticed that only Windows 7 workstations with a static IP were being registered we started troubleshooting.