Simon Bunce used to be a keen internet shopper, delighted to escape the hordes and have goods delivered to his door.

Mr Bunce knew he was innocent - he had never downloaded indecent images, and so he knew that the police would not find any evidence on the computers or storage devices they had taken away.

But the police's computer technicians take several months to examine these, and Mr Bunce could not afford to wait to repair the damage done to his reputation.

"I knew there'd been a fundamental mistake made and so I had to investigate it." Identity fraud occurs when personal information is used by someone else to obtain credit, goods or other services fraudulently.

You just never know when you'll need a fake credit card number - and when you do, here's a site can provide them for you.

This probably sounds like a sketchy idea, but it's actually quite legit - you often need a "valid" credit card number to test out payment functionality.

With ID fraud on the rise, the assumption is you'll lose money which can be claimed back.

But Simon Bunce lost his job, and his father cut off contact, when he was arrested after an ID fraudster used his credit card details on a child porn website.

Hampshire Police took away his computer and data storage devices including flash drives, CDs and floppy disks, as well as examining the computer and storage devices that he used at work. When his employers became aware of the reason he had been arrested, he was abruptly dismissed from his £120,000 a year job, and close members of his family disowned him.

"I made the mistake of telling my father, and he cut me off," Mr Bunce says.