Long before the days of Snapchat, sexting, and the tweets of Carlos Danger, anyone hoping to anonymously get their freak on online had to do so through chat rooms.But in case you missed the chat room phenomenon of the mid-’90s, you’ll get the gist of it from this absurd 1997 VHS tape that Found Footage Festival curators Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett stumbled upon at a Minnesota thrift store.

Officers took control of the teenager's computer and arrested the man the next day, said Special Agent Supervisor Jeffrey Duncan of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

The alleged predator has pleaded not guilty to multiple charges of soliciting a minor.

Duncan, one of a half-dozen law enforcement officials interviewed who praised Facebook for triggering inquiries, said: 'The manner and speed with which they contacted us gave us the ability to respond as soon as possible.'Facebook is among the many companies that are embracing a combination of new technologies and human monitoring to thwart sex predators.

Such efforts generally start with automated screening for inappropriate language and exchanges of personal information, and extend to using the records of convicted pedophiles' online chats to teach the software what to seek out.

Another pillar in Facebook's strategy is to limit how those under 18 can interact on the site and to make it harder for adults to find them.

Minors don't show up in public searches, only friends of friends can send them Facebook messages, and only friends can chat with them.

Technology is available for verifying the ages of Web and app users.

Facebook's software likewise depends on relationship analysis and archives of real chats that preceded sex assaults, Chief Security Officer Joe Sullivan told Reuters in the company's most expansive comments on the subject to date.

Like most of its peers, Facebook generally avoids discussing its safety practices to discourage scare stories, because it doesn't catch many wrongdoers, and to sidestep privacy concerns.

Users could be unnerved about the extent to which their conversations are reviewed, at least by computer programs.'We've never wanted to set up an environment where we have employees looking at private communications, so it's really important that we use technology that has a very low false-positive rate,' he said.

In addition, Facebook doesn't probe deeply into what it thinks are pre-existing relationships.