‘I ended up paying for everything and once, when I refused, he told me he could pick up any white woman he wanted who would be happy to give him money.’It is not just sex the women are seeking, though.Academic researchers often class women such as Barbara as ‘romance tourists’, as they usually believe the men they meet on holiday are in love with them.

White women who would never consider being openly involved with a young black man back home feel free to do so while travelling and often use this as an example of their ‘anti-racism’.

Uniformed security personnel rounded up obvious-looking bumsters, shaved off their dreadlocks and began routinely patrolling the tourist areas along the coast.

A similar initiative has since been tried in Negril.

According to the beach boys, there is little shame or stigma in selling sex to older white female tourists, and some claim earning money this way affirms their masculinity (photo from the 2012 film Paradise Love) Barbara is one such woman.

In her late 50s and divorced, she travelled to Jamaica for her first holiday alone last winter.

She had fantasies about sunbathing on white sand and swimming in a clear blue sea, but no plans for a holiday romance.

Not one of the women used the phrase ‘sex tourism’, but most of them discussed how they had sent money to their ‘boyfriends’ to pay an urgent debt or to rent accommodation in time for their next visit.‘Chris never got that money he was owed,’ she says.

Each year, as many as 600,000 women from Western countries are said to engage in sex tourism.

(The statistics in this area are little better than guesswork, given that few would confess to engaging in the practice in a self-reporting survey, but the figures for men are thought to be many times greater.)In 2001, research based on 240 interviews with women on the beaches of Negril and two similar resorts in the Dominican Republic suggested that almost a third had engaged in sexual relationships with local men in the course of their holiday.