Perhaps most surprising is that among men, all racial groups preferred another race over their own.AYI analyzed some 2.4 million heterosexual interactions—meaning every time a user clicked either “yes” or “skip”—to come up with these statistics.

Unsurprisingly, most “yes’s” go unanswered, but there are patterns: For example, Asian women responded to white men who “yessed” them 7.8% of the time, more often than they responded to any other race.

On the other hand, white men responded to black women 8.5% of the time—less often than for white, Latino, or Asian women.

In general, men responded to women about three times as often as women responded to men. All men except Asians preferred Asian women, while all except black women preferred white men.

And both black men and black women got the lowest response rates for their respective genders.

Turns out, the opposite may be true for women on the online dating scene.

Numbers culled from various dating sites have consistently shown both sexes prefer to date down the age spectrum rather than up. ), is one of the largest websites and apps designed to help users find their mates, but it works in an unconventional way.Users allow the app to access their Facebook profile, and people are then are paired based on interests.While he said white people were the most likely to consider relationships with people from other ethnic backgrounds, he said the biggest 'reversals' in preference, are observed among groups that display the greatest tendency towards in-group bias.Professor Lewis' study also found that a person who is contacted by someone from a different racial background for the first time is more likely to reply, which he explains using his theory about 'pre-emptive discrimination'.'Based on a lifetime of experiences in a racist and racially segregated society, people anticipate discrimination on the part of a potential recipient and are largely unwilling to reach out in the first place,' he said.The data shown above come from the Facebook dating app, Are You Interested (AYI), which works like this: Users in search of someone for a date or for sex flip through profiles of other users and, for each one, click either “yes” (I like what I see) or “skip” (show me the next profile).When the answer is “yes,” the other user is notified and has the opportunity to respond. The graphic shows what percentage of people responded to a “yes,” based on the gender and ethnicity of both parties (the data are only for opposite-sex pairs of people).